Tennessee Makes Community College Tuition Free For All Adults

If there’s one thing that flourishing Nordic and certain European countries have proven, it’s that an educated group of citizens ultimately benefits their societies.

By offering free or low cost tuition to citizens, they’re able to get better jobs, innovate in their respective industries, and produce more for not only their families but for the rest of their country. This benefits everyone on a whole and generally makes everybody happier.

With rising tuition costs in America, generations of people are getting mired in student loans and debt. Many people are left paying off their loans for the rest of their lives. Recently, however, some politicians and state legislators have worked on solutions for this rising tuition problem. Middle class students in New York can now attend college for free, but it’s not the only state looking to solve college tuition woes for Americans.

Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam just signed a bill that will make community college tuition absolutely free for adults in the state.

The governor traveled to Walters State Community College to officially sign the bill into law as part of the Tennessee Reconnect Program.

The free tuition promise does come with a few conditions, though. Applicants must be state residents for at least a year, fill out a Free Application for Federal Student Aid, enroll in enough classes to qualify as a part-time student, and maintain a 2.0 GPA. Also, it’s only available to residents who don’t already have a degree.

Tennessee’s set an aggressive goal in educating the state population and Governor Haslam hopes the bill will ensure adults enroll in community colleges, now that it’s free of charge. 

Recent pushes towards better education initiatives, however, indicate that the state is on its way to a better overall national education ranking in the future. Giving adults access to free higher education certainly seems like a step in the right direction. Now if we could only get all 50 states on board.

[h/t WJHL, CNN Money]

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